Stories about life in Liddonfield housing project and its impact on the Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood of Upper Holmesburg. These true stories reveal how government policy affected the lives of real people, from the project residents to area homeowners during the 5 decades of Liddonfield’s existence. Stories and articles are written by a former resident of the project.

FIGHT THE STIGMA!

FIGHT THE STIGMA!
Rosemary Reeves, Blogger, standing on Philadelphia Skyline

Jan 29, 2010

Public Housing Family Has Bad Experience in Middle-Class Neighborhood

video


When this video was posted in January 2010, I mistakenly said that Liddonfield was originally a military compound; this is a common misconception, based on the fact that housing for military personnel was built nearby in the 1940's and Liddonfield (which resembled a compound) was built shortly after.  Since then, research by Fred Moore of the Northeast Philadelphia History Network (NEPHN) revealed aerial photographs confirming the land was undeveloped prior to the housing project being constructed.   

Related videos on this blog:
Public Housing as Segregation 
Public Housing Book of Baby Names

8 comments:

  1. I DONT THINK WE CHOSE TO STAY WE HAD NO CHOICE DAD WAS A DRUNK SO WAS MOM WE GREW UP VERY POOR I WAS BORN AND RAISED THERE AT ONE TIME IT WAS A NICE PLACE TO LIVE BUT AT LEAST YOU WAS WHITE.. WE WHERE AMERICAN INDIAN JUST LIKE HOW U WAS TREATED DIFFERENT IN THAT NEW AREA WE WAS TREATED THAT WAY IN THE PROJECTS SO BE GLAD YOU GOT OUT WHEN YOU COULD THANK YOU FOR YOUR STORY

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  2. i grew up in the project from 1959 to 1974, had great time ,enojyed playing with everyone. only 2 black familys back then, where are all the people from the 60's & 70's.my mother finaly left 1983 .we had great times..good people.the christmas partys in the hall,bell's hogies, the little deil on ditman & tobeut. good ,fun times. barb

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  3. Enjoyed your video. I understood being poor but I also knew that the world wasn't over ,That in spite of that (Being poor) and percieved 'Class differences' in the world that even being White couldn't overcome,that I could make a good life for myself,In spite of my poor family life & background. I made countless friends in the project,and what I gained as a person is something many others will never know!!

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  4. I ALSO LIVED IN LINDONFIELD HALF MY LIFE AND ALSO RECALL THE LABELING TO AND IT DID BOTHER ME WHEN I WAS YOUTH BUT AS I GOT OLDER I REALIZED I LIVED A BETTER LIFE THEN HALF THE HOMEOWNERS AROUND THERE AND WHILE THEY STUCK THEIR NOSES UP IN THE AIR, AND DOWNED US LIVING THERE MORE OF THE CRIMES WERE COMMITTED BY THE HOME OWNERS ACROSS THE ST. WE MAY HAVE BEEN POOR BUT WAS RICH WITH FAMILY AND LOVE FROM EVERYONE WHO THERE IN THERE!!!!!! SO FOE THOSE WHO HAVE NOTHING NICE TO SAY ABOUT LINDONFEILD PROJECT STICK UP YOUR NOSE......PROUD OF WHO I AM AND WHERE I COME FROM!!!!!!!!

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  5. I listened to your video and as I am sorry that you were made fun of growing up outside of Liddonfield, you were only eight years old when you moved out and really didn't experience Liddonfield. I moved into Liddonfield when I was six years old (1972)and moved out with I was 18 years old (1983). I lived on Megargee Street as well and my experiences there were great! Yes, we were the poor ones to the outside world, but inside the projects everyone was the same. I have many good memories of everyone being outside playing ball and hanging out. Even the adults would all bring their lawn chairs out on summer evenings. There is a stigma to being a "jector", but I don't think I would have changed a thing. It makes us who we are.

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  6. We moved there around 1965. I remember lots of friendly, caring people. My mom met other women who were also recently divorced with no skills. They had great commradarie. My mom made many friends there, eventually all but one of them moved out but their friendship endured throughout their life. Even now, some of the "kids" continue to be in touch. I remember the basketball courts and going with my mom to pay the rent and the Christmas parties. I remember McDonald's where we were able to walk to because there were no streets to cross. We lived on Cottage St. It was when people started to not care that the housing went downhill. When I lived there, the sense of community was something that was tangible. It was a much more innocent time.

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  7. we lived there 1960 until 13 years ago. I now live across the street(with a lot of other people who grew up in Liddonfield), we were called trash too but Liddonfield has created the person I am today--it was a great ride and I wouldnt have missed it for the world :) McLaughlin-Glenloch St

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